Supporting the RICS International BIM Implementation Guide

Adrian Malone
As part of the RICS Global BIM Working Group I was asked to contribute to a document that would move past the 'Why BIM' question to 'How BIM'.

The document focuses on recommending good practice for professionals and organisations about how to adjust and adapt in order to implement BIM on their projects.

The guide was developed by the RICS Global BIM Working Group, chaired by Alan Muse, Director of the Built Environment at RICS and the lead technical author of the guide was Anil Sawhney, Associate Dean, RICS School of Built Environment, India. The guide brought in experience from across the world supported by the other members of the Working Group.

I have always been interested in how BIM is used across the world since seeing how it was being used in Northern Europe several years ago whilst working on the EU Framework 6 - Research and Development project which involved 23 partners from 9 countries to develop an open system for industrialised construction. It was clear to me at this time that whilst each national market has its own unique characteristics we can learn and improve the way we deliver projects through sharing and understanding best practices from different parts of the world.

...we can learn and improve the way we deliver projects through sharing and understanding best practices from different parts of the world.

The guide itself sets out key principles for the use of BIM in the design, construction and operation of assets in the built environment. This guide looks at why BIM is important, and maps the status and adoption of BIM globally. The guide provides an overview of BIM as a technology, its use in project delivery across the whole asset lifecycle, and the implications of BIM on organisations.

Maturity of BIM use and the way it is adopted across the world is different. The guide taps into experience of BIM use from around the world and to draw out key principles around people, process and technology across the whole lifecycle of a construction or building environment.

I see this document as a positive step towards consolidating best practice in the use of BIM and ensuring consistent messaging.

Having watched and contributed to BIM development across Faithful+Gould, the Atkins Group, and in the industry, I see this document as a positive step towards consolidating best practice in the use of BIM and ensuring consistent messaging. With each country having their own areas of strength in the use of BIM at different stages of the lifecycle, it draws together experiences from around the world for the betterment of the future use of BIM.

I am extremely proud to have contributed to this guidance note and would strongly encourage anyone interested in BIM to read it.

The guide can be found on the RICS website.